The Most Iconic Job in Each State

Whether it is a gaming supervisor in Nevada, a farm worker in California, an extraction worker in North Dakota, or a petroleum engineer in Texas, one occupation is often more strongly associated with a state than any other. While capturing the perception Americans have of a state can be difficult, comparing a job’s concentration in a state’s workforce compared to its concentration nationwide is one way to identify the most iconic job in each state.

Based on workforce composition data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the location quotients for each job in each state. A location quotient measures the concentration of a job in a particular state relative to the national average concentration for that job. A state’s most distinctive, or iconic, job was defined as the job that had the highest location quotient in that state.

ALSO READ: The Largest Employer in Each State

Nearly half of the most iconic jobs had at least 10 times the concentration of the job in the national workforce. For example, the share of chemists in Delaware’s workforce was roughly 13 times greater than the share of chemists in the national workforce. In Alaska, the ratio was far higher. The concentration of mining machine operators was more than 58 times the national average concentration of this job. These are the most iconic jobs in each state.

Click here to see the most iconic job in each state.

Despite being a state’s iconic job, many of them made up a small share of the state’s workforce. Due to the nation’s especially diverse economy, the most iconic job in all but two states did not exceed 1% of the state’s workforce.

Yet, a relatively high percentage of nationwide workers employed in a state’s iconic job worked in that state. For example, while petroleum engineers — the most iconic job in Texas — comprised just 0.18% of the state’s workforce, nearly 57% of all petroleum engineers nationwide were employed in Texas.

“Certain occupations are just naturally found in certain industries,” said Martin Kohli, chief regional economist at the BLS, in an interview with 24/7 Wall St. Gaming supervisors are employed disproportionately by casinos, and casinos are disproportionately located in Nevada. Similarly, aircraft assemblers work primarily at aircraft manufacturing plants, which are also found disproportionately in certain geographical locations such as Washington.

Kohli went on to explain that, apparently, location matters a great deal to U.S. companies. Otherwise, there would not be the “geographic division of labor” shown by the diversity of iconic jobs across the country.

While the most iconic jobs in each state ought to align with perceptions held by Americans of the particular state, many of the jobs identified as iconic may be surprising. According to Kohli, shifts in the economy can partly explain these cases. For example, the furniture upholsterer occupation — the most iconic job in Mississippi — often complements auto manufacturing as vehicles require upholstery. While most auto-related jobs are still found in Michigan and the Midwest, the auto manufacturing industry has expanded considerably in the southern United States.

Some iconic jobs are part of industries long-associated with the region. Textile jobs have historically been very concentrated in Georgia and North Carolina, in which such jobs were identified as the most iconic. However, these industries are shrinking rapidly and may soon fall off the list of the states’ most distinctive occupations, according to Kohli.

Iconic jobs tended to be higher-paying. However, this was not always the case. The median salary for the most iconic job in 30 states was higher than the median for all statewide occupations, while in the other 20 states the median salaries of the iconic jobs were lower than the state’s average.

To identify the most iconic job in each state, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the highest location quotient for each job in each state from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). If an occupation was identified as iconic, but only made up one of every 2,000 jobs in the state or less, the next most iconic job was considered instead. State annual median salaries for all occupations and particular iconic occupations also came from the BLS. GDP contributions by industry came from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). State workforce compositions came from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS). All data are as of 2013, the most recent period for which data is available.

These are the most iconic jobs in each state.

1. Alabama
> Most iconic job:
Layout Workers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,689
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $48,330

The most iconic job in Alabama is the layout worker, with the state employing over nine times the national average share in this occupation in 2013. Layout workers set up and operate machines that process metal and plastic materials. Despite the fact that Alabama’s workforce comprised only about 1.5% of the total U.S. workforce, roughly 13% of all of the layout workers in the country worked in Alabama. This is consistent with the the above-average role that manufacturing plays in the Alabama economy compared to the rest of the country.

ALSO READ: The Worst Product Flops of All Time

2. Alaska
> Most iconic job:
Mining Machine Operators, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 388
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $47,830

The most iconic job in Alaska is the mining machine operator, with the state employing more than 58 times the national average share in this role in 2013. Alaska has some of the richest energy resources in the United States. The state is the fourth largest oil producing state in the country. With much of the economic activity in the state devoted to extracting these resources, the energy industry makes up a relatively large share of the state’s economy. This concentration in the energy industry is reflected in the employment figures. While Alaskans comprised just over 0.2% of U.S. workers, they comprised roughly 14% of U.S. mining machine operators.

3. Arizona
> Most iconic job:
Plasterers and Stucco Masons
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,678
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $32,160

The most iconic job in Arizona is the plasterer and stucco mason, with the state employing over four times the national average share in this role in 2013. Just under 2% of total U.S. employees worked in Arizona, but over 8% of the country’s plasterers and stucco masons worked in the state. The prevalence of this role is attributable in part to the state’s construction and real estate industries, with each sector accounting for above-average shares of the economy.

ALSO READ: 15 Cities With the Most High-Tech Jobs

4. Arkansas
> Most iconic job:
Food Processing Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,909
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $22,220

The most iconic job in Arkansas is the food processing worker, which made up nearly eight times the state’s labor force relative to the national average share. Unlike in most states, Arkansas’ iconic job paid less than the overall median wage for workers in the state.

ALSO READ: The States Volunteering the Most (and Least)

5. California
> Most iconic job:
Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 171,159
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $18,510

The share of California’s workforce employed as farm workers and laborers was nearly six times greater than the comparable national share. The San Joaquin Valley, which is a major source of the nation’s agricultural products, employs many of the state’s farm laborers. Nearly two-thirds of all documented U.S. farm workers were employed in the state, far higher than the comparable shares in other states. The median salary for the more than 171,000 farm workers was just $18,510, roughly half the median for all occupations in California.

6. Colorado
> Most iconic job:
Atmospheric and Space Scientists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,804
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $92,480

The share of Colorado’s workforce employed as atmospheric and space scientists was higher than the occupation’s nationwide share. No other occupation in the state had such a high share when compared to the national share. The proportion was roughly 10 times the occupation’s national average composition. Atmospheric and space scientists observe and interpret meteorological data, most of which is collected by instruments such as satellites.

ALSO READ: The Largest Employer in Each State

7. Connecticut
> Most iconic job:
Actuaries
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,281
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $102,280

Actuaries were the most iconic jobs in Connecticut, as the proportion of the workforce employed in such positions was more than five times the comparable national share — a higher relative concentration than that of any other occupation in the state. This is largely due to the large number of insurance companies operating in Connecticut. Actuaries in the state were paid quite well, earning an annual median salary of $102,280 in 2013. This was one of the higher wages among all occupations and well more than double the statewide annual median salary of $42,280.

8. Delaware
> Most iconic job:
Chemists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,455
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $88,870

The share of Delaware’s workforce employed as chemists was nearly 13 times greater than the national average proportion. As in most states, people employed in Delaware’s most iconic profession earned more than those in other occupations in the state. Delaware chemists had an annual median salary of $88,870 in 2013, far higher than the median across all state occupations of $37,320.

ALSO READ: Companies Profiting the Most from War

9. Florida
> Most iconic job:
Athletes and Sports Competitors
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,861
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $32,450

Nearly 28% of the nation’s athletes and sports competitors were employed in Florida in 2013, the state’s most iconic job. While just 0.05% of the state’s workforce were professional athletes, this was nearly five times greater than the comparable national proportion.

10. Georgia
> Most iconic job:
Textile Winding, Twisting, and Drawing Out Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 7,988
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $27,410

There were nearly 8,000 machine setters, operators, and tenders working primarily in the textile industry in Georgia, or just over 0.20% of the state’s workforce. Nearly 31% of all U.S. textile machine setters worked in Georgia. Unlike most states, residents working in Georgia’s most iconic job tended to earn less than other state residents. Georgian textile machine setters, operators, and tenders had a median income of $27,410, versus the state median of $32,510 across all occupations in 2013. While the state has historically been the source of much of the nation’s textile products, the industry has been shrinking in recent years.

11. Hawaii
> Most iconic job:
Dancers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 672
> Annual median salary, iconic job: N/A

Tourism and its supporting industries are major drivers of Hawaii’s economy. The arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services industry accounted for more than 9% of Hawaii’s economic output in 2013, the second highest such contribution nationwide. This partly explains the state’s most iconic job: dancers. Nearly 6% of all professional dancers in the nation worked in Hawaii.

ALSO READ: 15 Cities With the Most High-Tech Jobs

12. Idaho
> Most iconic job:
Forest and Conservation Technicians
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,142
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $31,320

Forest and conservation technicians were the most iconic jobs in Idaho. This means they were more concentrated compared to the national average for the profession than every other job in the state. In addition, more than 7% of all U.S. forest and conservation technicians worked in Idaho.

13. Illinois
> Most iconic job:
Grounds Maintenance Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,560
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $31,210

While 4.3% of the U.S. workforce was employed in Illinois, nearly 19% of all grounds maintenance workers — Illinois’ most iconic job — were employed in the state. Grounds maintenance workers in Illinois were more than four times more concentrated than the national average. While Illinois grounds keepers had a median household income of $31,210 — less than the median for all occupations in the state — the BLS projects an increasing demand for landscaping work and above average job prospects for the occupation.

ALSO READ: Apple Short Interest Falls 10%

14. Indiana
> Most iconic job:
Boilermakers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,192
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $66,080

Indiana’s manufacturing industry accounted for 30% of the state’s economic output, the second highest such contribution nationwide and the largest of all state industries. In keeping with the dominant sector, the most iconic job in Indiana is the boilermaker. While 2.2% of the U.S. workforce was employed in Indiana, nearly 14% of all boilermakers worked in the state.

ALSO READ: 10 Retailers Closing the Most Stores

15. Iowa
> Most iconic job:
Soil and Plant Scientists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,897
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $63,930

The most iconic job in Iowa was the soil and plant scientist. Iowa had over 12 times more soil and plant scientists in its labor force than the average state. Such scientists are involved in research related to the production of agricultural products and their derivatives. The high concentration of plant scientists in the state is likely attributable to the large share of agricultural activity conducted in Iowa. Workers in this role had a median income of $63,930 in 2013, roughly twice the median income for all of the workers in Iowa.

16. Kansas
> Most iconic job:
Agricultural Equipment Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,236
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $28,230

The most iconic job in Kansas was agricultural equipment operators. Roughly five times as many agricultural equipment operators were employed in Kansas relative to its labor force than the average state. People in this role engage in the physical work, or operate the machines, necessary to harvest crops.

ALSO READ: States With the Highest Gas Prices

17. Kentucky
> Most iconic job:
Roof Bolters in the Mining Sector
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,118
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $53,820

The most iconic job in Kentucky is the roof bolter in the mining sector. Such workers are responsible for installing roof support bolts in underground mines. This role was more than 14 times more prevalent in Kentucky’s labor force than in the average state. Despite the fact that Kentucky comprised just over 1% of U.S. employment, nearly 20% of U.S. mining roof bolters were employed in the state. This is largely attributable to the large amount of coal mining activity in Kentucky.

18. Louisiana
> Most iconic job:
Riggers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 4,917
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $35,020

The most iconic job in Louisiana is the rigger. Riggers are responsible for setting up and repairing the rigging used in industries such as shipping and manufacturing. Despite being home to only about 1.5% of all U.S. workers, the state was home to more than 28% of all U.S. riggers. This is in part attributable to the major shipping activity in the Port of South Louisiana, which is one of the busiest ports in the western hemisphere.

19. Maine
> Most iconic job:
Logging Equipment Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,199
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $32,850

The most iconic job in Maine was the logging equipment operator. The prevalence of such workers in the state was 11 times greater than their prevalence across all states. This is in part attributable to the fact that lumber and lumber products such as paper are among Maine’s primary industrial outputs.

ALSO READ: The Best (and Worst) Paying Cities for Women

20. Maryland
> Most iconic job:
Subway and Streetcar Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,053
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $52,650

The most iconic job in Maryland was the subway and streetcar operator. Over 20% of U.S. subway and streetcar operators worked in Maryland, and Maryland had more than 12 times the national average share employed in its labor force. Baltimore and Washington D.C., two large regional job centers, are within commuting distance for many Maryland workers.

21. Massachusetts
> Most iconic job:
Biochemists and Biophysicists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,844
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $100,980

The most iconic job in Massachusetts was the biochemist and biophysicist. This is attributable to the fact that Boston is one of the national hubs for the biotechnology industry. In 2013, the median income of biochemists and biophysicists was $100,980, more than twice the median for all workers in Massachusetts.

ALSO READ: 10 Disappearing Middle Class Jobs

22. Michigan
> Most iconic job:
Tool and Die Makers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 13,336
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $50,150

The most iconic job in Michigan was the tool and die maker. Close to 20% of U.S. tool and die makers were employed in Michigan, and the job was over five times more prevalent in the Michigan labor force than the average prevalence among all states. This is due to the major role that auto and auto part manufacturing plays in the Michigan economy. Dies or forms used to stamp and mold metal are a main component of the manufacturing industry.

23. Minnesota
> Most iconic job:
Food Scientists and Technologists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,065
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $71,540

The most iconic job in Minnesota was the food scientist and technologist. People in the occupation are involved with food processing. The high prevalence of this role in Minnesota is in part attributable to the fact that major food production companies, such as General Mills and Cargill, operate in the state.

ALSO READ: What an 84% Dividend Cut Is REALLY Telling Investors

24. Mississippi
> Most iconic job:
Upholsterers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,943
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $32,930

The job that stood out most in Mississippi was the upholsterer. Upholsterers were more than 16 times more prevalent in the Mississippi labor force than in the average state. Upholstering is associated with auto manufacturing, as cars need to be upholstered, and the industry has expanded considerably in the southern United States in recent years.

ALSO READ: Cities With the Highest (and Lowest) Unemployment

25. Missouri
> Most iconic job:
Psychiatric Technicians
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 4,935
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $23,080

Psychiatric technicians were the most iconic jobs in Missouri. Psychiatric technicians care for and monitor people with mental or emotional conditions. They are often responsible for administering medications, looking after a patient’s personal hygiene, and performing other tasks people with disabilities may be unable to perform. The occupation was nearly four times more concentrated in Missouri than the national average share. Psychiatric technicians had a median income of $23,080, lower than the statewide median for all occupations.

26. Montana
> Most iconic job:
Loading Machine Operators in Underground Mining
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 231
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $52,430

The most iconic job in Montana were loading machine operators in underground mines. These jobs were more than 21 times more prevalent in the Montana labor force than in the average state. This is in part attributable to large scale silver and gold mining operations in the state.

ALSO READ: The States Where the Rich are Getting Richer

27. Nebraska
> Most iconic job:
Meat, Poultry, and Fish Cutters and Trimmers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 11,625
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $28,030

The most iconic job in Nebraska was meat, poultry, and fish cutters and trimmers. This job was over 10 times more prevalent in the Nebraska labor force than in the average state. This is in part attributable to the fact that Nebraska produces the most red meat of all states. The state produced nearly 7.4 billion pounds of red meat in 2013.

28. Nevada
> Most iconic job:
Gaming Supervisors
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 6,986
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $53,100

The most iconic job in Nevada was the gaming supervisor, as you would expect, since a large portion of the nation’s casinos are found in Nevada. Gaming supervisors monitor the gaming floors to make sure that everything is running smoothly in the casino. Nearly 28% of the nation’s gaming supervisors were employed in Nevada.

29. New Hampshire
> Most iconic job:
Metal Workers and Plastic Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,229
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $30,880

While less than 0.50% of the U.S. workforce was employed in New Hampshire, 5.5% of the nation’s metal and plastic workers were employed in the state. In addition, the share of such workers in New Hampshire was nearly 12 times more concentrated than the comparable national average share. More than 14% of the state’s workforce was employed in manufacturing versus the national share of 10.5%.

ALSO READ: The Best (and Worst) States for Business

30. New Jersey
> Most iconic job:
Marriage and Family Therapists
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 4,169
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $70,250

Marriage and family therapists, New Jersey’s most iconic job, were nearly five times more concentrated in the state compared to the national average concentration. New Jersey residents working in the occupation had a median annual salary of more than $70,000, far higher than the median for all occupations in the state. With the lowest proportion of state residents having filed for divorce in 2013, such professionals may also be quite effective.

31. New Mexico
> Most iconic job:
Physical Scientists, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,656
> Annual median salary, iconic job: N/A

The most iconic job in New Mexico is perhaps more mysterious than iconic jobs in other states. The share of New Mexico’s workforce employed as physical scientists — excluding astronomers, chemists, life scientists, physicists, and other common physical science occupations — was nearly 12 times higher than the national average concentration. Many of these scientists may be employed in the government sector, which accounted for nearly 24% of the state’s GDP, more than any other statewide industry. The state is home to Los Alamos National Laboratories and the primary site of Sandia National Laboratories. The government was one of the larger state employers.

ALSO READ: America’s 50 Coldest Cities

32. New York
> Most iconic job:
Fashion Designers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 7,176
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $68,880

While New York may be well known for its finance industry, its most standout occupation with respect to the rest of the nation is the fashion designer. New York City is the hub for the nation’s fashion industry, with more than 40% of the nation’s fashion designers employed in New York.

33. North Carolina
> Most iconic job:
Textile Machine Operator
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 6,880
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $23,180

The most iconic job in North Carolina was the textile machine operator. While the workforce in North Carolina comprised less than 3% of the total U.S. workforce, more than 25% of the nation’s textile machine operators were employed in the state. North Carolina employed the second most textile workers in the nation after Georgia.

ALSO READ: Why Apple Shares Could Drop Back to $100

34. North Dakota
> Most iconic job:
Extraction Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 907
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $42,590

The most prevalent job in North Dakota relative to the rest of the nation was extraction workers. The state’s booming energy sector, particularly the fracking industry, likely employs most such workers.

ALSO READ: America’s Happiest (and most Miserable) States

35. Ohio
> Most iconic job:
Tool and Die Makers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 10,431
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $45,760

More than 13% of the nation’s tool and die makers, Ohio’s most iconic job, worked in the state in 2013. Dies or forms used to stamp and mold metal are a main component of the manufacturing industry. Ohio’s manufacturing industry accounted for 17.5% of the state’s economic output, one of the highest contributions compared to other states. Nearly 16% of the state’s workforce was employed in the industry, also one of the highest shares.

36. Oklahoma
> Most iconic job:
Oil and Gas Derrick Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,166
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $44,310

The most prevalent job in Oklahoma relative to the rest of the nation was derrick operator in the oil and gas industry. About 15% of the nation’s oil and gas derrick operators were employed in the state. This is attributable to the fact that Oklahoma is a major contributor to the nation’s overall energy production. Oklahoma was the fourth largest natural gas producing state and sixth largest crude oil producing state in the nation as of 2013.

ALSO READ: The Worst Paying Jobs for Women

37. Oregon
> Most iconic job:
Logging Workers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,393
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $34,560

The most iconic job in Oregon was the logging worker. Oregon is the number one producer of softwood lumber in the nation, accounting for roughly 20% of total national production. Roughly 57,000 state residents were employed in Oregon’s forest sector.

38. Pennsylvania
> Most iconic job:
Survey Researchers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,921
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $27,330

Survey researchers were the most iconic profession in Pennsylvania. While roughly 4.3% of the nation’s workforce was employed in Pennsylvania, nearly 17% of all survey researchers worked in the state. In addition, the share of the state’s workforce employed as survey researchers was nearly four times more concentrated than the national average share. According to the BLS, the occupation is expected to grow considerably faster than the national average growth rate for all occupations.

39. Rhode Island
> Most iconic job:
Textile Bleaching and Dyeing Machine Operators and Tenders
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 308
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $33,720

Textile tenders use machines or manually perform finishing work on fabrics, including bleaching, shrinking, and dying. The occupation was the most iconic in Rhode Island. Unlike most of the annual median salaries for states’ most iconic jobs, the median salary of textile workers in Rhode Island of $33,720 was lower than the median for all occupations in the state of $37,500.

ALSO READ: States Smoking the Most Smuggled Cigarettes

40. South Carolina
> Most iconic job:
Tire Builders
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 2,856
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $44,550

The most iconic job in South Carolina was the tire builder. Such workers operate the machinery used in tire production. While South Carolina was home to just over 1% of total U.S. employees, it was home to more than 15% of the country’s tire builders. South Carolina is the biggest tire producer and exporter in the nation.

41. South Dakota
> Most iconic job:
Forest and Conservation Workers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 428
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $25,600

The most iconic job in South Dakota was forest and conservation workers, who work in state and national parks. These workers were more than 20 times more prevalent in the South Dakota labor force than the average state. One of the reasons for this may be that South Dakota receives much more annual visits to its state and national parks than its population size. In 2010, there were more than 4 million park visits in the state compared to its population of just over 800,000.

ALSO READ: The 10 Richest U.S. Presidents

42. Tennessee
> Most iconic job:
Conveyor Operators and Tenders
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 3,858
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $29,310

The most iconic job in Tennessee are conveyor operators and tenders. This job was nearly five times more prevalent in the Tennessee workforce than in the average state. This is likely due to manufacturing contributing an above average share to the Tennessee economy.

43. Texas
> Most iconic job:
Petroleum Engineers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 19,667
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $143,210

The most prevalent job in Texas relative to the national average was petroleum engineer. Nearly 57% of the nation’s petroleum engineers were employed in Texas. The state produces the most crude oil and natural gas out of any state — in both cases producing more than double the next largest producing state.

ALSO READ: Top Analyst Upgrades and Downgrades: AK Steel, Carnival, EMC, Kinder Morgan, NVIDIA, Staples, Tyco and More

44. Utah
> Most iconic job:
Continuous Mining Machine Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 819
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $53,790

The most iconic job in Utah was the continuous mining machine operator. Continuous mining machines are used for rapidly mining resources such as coal. Nearly 7% of the nations continuous mining machine operators worked in Utah, reflecting the prevalent role of such mining operations in the state’s economy.

ALSO READ: Cities Where No One Wants to Drive

45. Vermont
> Most iconic job:
Furniture Finishers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 307
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $27,370

The most prevalent job in the Vermont economy relative to the average state was the furniture finisher. This role is almost 10 times more prevalent in the Vermont economy than in the average state.

46. Virginia
> Most iconic job:
Legal Support Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 8,948
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $95,320

The most iconic job in Virginia was the legal support worker. These jobs were more than seven times more prevalent in the Virginia workforce than in the average state. Legal activity plays a larger role in the state’s economy than the average share among states due its proximity to Washington D.C.

ALSO READ: Cities Where Crimes is Plummeting

47. Washington
> Most iconic job:
Aircraft Assemblers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 14,311
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $48,710

The most iconic job in Washington was the aircraft assembler. This job was more than 15 times more prevalent in Washington than it was in the average state. Also, about a third of all of the nation’s aircraft assemblers worked in the state. Washington is widely recognized as the nation’s center for commercial aircraft manufacturing. For example, most of Boeing’s employees located in Washington.

48. West Virginia
> Most iconic job:
Mine Shuttle Car Operators
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,122
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $54,090

The most iconic job in West Virginia was the mine shuttle car operator. The share of this job in West Virginia’s employment was more than 76 times that of the average state, and over 40% of the nation’s mine shuttle car operators worked in the state. This is attributable to the large amount of coal mining activity, with West Virginia producing the second largest amount of coal after Wyoming.

49. Wisconsin
> Most iconic job:
Foundry Mold and Coremakers
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 1,672
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $30,580

The most iconic job in Wisconsin was the foundry mold and coremaker. These jobs were more than six times more prevalent in Wisconsin than they were in the average state. This is attributable to the above average contribution that manufacturing makes to the Wisconsin economy.

ALSO READ: Companies Cutting the Most Jobs

50. Wyoming
> Most iconic job:
Extraction Workers, All Other
> Number of people employed in occupation in state: 488
> Annual median salary, iconic job: $42,430

The most prevalent job in Wyoming relative to the rest of the nation was the extraction worker. The state’s booming energy sector, particularly the fracking industry, likely employs most such workers.

Related Articles

Source Article from http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-iconic-job-state-171039772.html

This entry was posted in News & Info. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*